Author Topic: opusenc.exe update / inclusion?  (Read 344 times)

hiccup

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More of a suggestion than a wish:

To encode to Opus, you need to download the EncoderPack.
I noticed it contains a slightly older opusenc version (1.2.1 instead of 1.3)
(it won't probably matter much, but they do mention some bug fixes)

Also, considering the quality and relevance of Opus, perhaps include it with MB by default?

Mr. Trev

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relevance of opus? I can't say I've talked with anybody that uses it.
What's it good for? …just asking

sveakul

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relevance of opus? I can't say I've talked with anybody that uses it.
What's it good for? …just asking
Listening tests are always controversial, but many tend to produce results like this:
https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php?topic=120007.0

Discussion on the codec:
https://hydrogenaud.io/index.php/board,71.0.html

Opusenc.exe 1.3.1 download:
https://opus-codec.org/release/stable/2019/04/12/libopus-1_3_1.html
Last Edit: December 26, 2022, 10:18:18 PM by sveakul

Zak

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What's it good for?
Everything.  ;)

You could consider it the successor to Vorbis, but it also includes a separate algorithm for speech to provide a single codec suitable for all purposes.
Which isn't to say it will choose one algorithm to encode a music audio file differently from a spoken audio file - it can switch per frame for optimal results.

Tech specs from the project web site:
Bitrates from 6 kb/s to 510 kb/s
Sampling rates from 8 kHz (narrowband) to 48 kHz (fullband)
Frame sizes from 2.5 ms to 60 ms
Support for both constant bitrate (CBR) and variable bitrate (VBR)
Audio bandwidth from narrowband to fullband
Support for speech and music
Support for mono and stereo
Support for up to 255 channels (multistream frames)
Dynamically adjustable bitrate, audio bandwidth, and frame size
Good loss robustness and packet loss concealment (PLC)
Floating point and fixed-point implementation
https://opus-codec.org

And it's a royalty-free open format etc.

It's a good choice for people who compress their music when they sync it to a phone because you can get transparency with lower bitrates to free up storage space. It should play fine on any Android phone from the past few years. Not sure about iPhones because... Apple.
Bee excellent to each other...

Mr. Trev

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I have no skin in this game, really - I'm a lossless guy. I was just wondering what opus offered over the more typical fare (aac, wavpack, etc.), so thanks for the explanation

I guess, ultimately, I see no reason why any of the included codecs shouldn't be the most recent versions (as long as they're stable)
Last Edit: December 28, 2022, 01:36:42 AM by Mr. Trev

hiccup

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I guess, ultimately, I see no reason why any of the included codecs shouldn't be the most recent versions (as long as they're stable)
I believe OPUS has been included in previous MusicBee versions, but at some time it was removed. (together with some other codecs)
My wish/suggestion is only that either the optional Encoder Pack is updated with this new version, or that it gets included in MusicBee again.

Me calling it 'relevant' surely could be argued, if you consider adaptation.
But it does seem to be the very best lossy codec out there at this moment.
And (same as flac) it uses Vorbis comment for metadata, which makes it a good match with MusicBee.
Last Edit: December 28, 2022, 02:29:08 AM by hiccup